History of Hunmanby Hall

 

TIMETABLE
Timetable for the First Term 1928

Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Arithmetic
Botany
Sewing
Arithmetic
Drill
Singing
Algebra
Scripture
Geometry
Geography
Geometry
Singing
Break
Break
Break
Break
Break
Break
Latin
Arithmetic
Drill
French
Arithmetic
Mending
French
Drawing
History
Scripture
English
Mending
English
Drawing
French
Botany
History
Mending
Dinner
Dinner
Dinner
Dinner
Dinner
Dinner
Science
English
Prep
English
Latin
Holiday
Science
Geography
Latin
Algebra
Prep
Holiday
Prep
Prep
Prep
Prep
Prep
Holiday
Science
Botany
History
Scripture
English
Holiday
French
Arithmetic
Maths
English
History
Holiday
Algebra
Scripture
French
NL
NL
NL
English
Geography
Latin
NL
NL
NL

The early timetable above was much altered and enlarged as the school evolved. Each day, all classes had gymnastic lessons and games periods – Juniors and Seniors, each afternoon. Every morning the rising bell would sound at 7.15 a.m. All were expected downstairs before 8am. Dormitory stewards had to see each girl was properly dressed with tidy hair and shoes fastened! Class work began at 9.45 after morning prayers in the hall/dining room – later the Assembly Hall. In each class a roll call was made by those in charge. Many of us recall the stimulating gatherings each day of morning prayers. Starting with a chosen pupil coming forward near the lamp and reading a ‘lamp verse’ – a passage from the bible. A form captain took the taper, which had been passed around the entire school and lit the lamp. A short talk from the Headmistress and any notices were then given before we started lessons. It must be said with the building of the wings – some truly delightful classrooms were included with windows opening out to the quadrangle and with parquet flooring.

The science, cookery and geography rooms possessed excellent equipment, truly an asset for our tuition. The laboratories had every modern item from sinks to funnels, books, shelves and cupboards. Botany and Physics laboratory’s in the North Wing and Cookery room with its slab marble floor and long high windows overlooking Castle Hill, held sewing machines, sinks and stoves and stools. Each table was white wood and was scrubbed at the end of each lesson. Geography saw a three sided windowed room at the end of the north wing with superb views. All the 6 foot high windows could also be opened onto the quadrangle. There were large and small storing cupboards for sheet maps, graphs and wall charts of every place ‘under the sun’, measuring items – wooden and metal with specimens of foreign fruits and shells. The central feature in all classrooms and art room were desks, water pots, paper and paint and large double blackboards.



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